Sitting down witht the Murder and the Hurdey Curdy Girl author, Kate McLachlan

Kate, thank you so much for taking time to answer some questions for members of the Gay Mystery-Thriller-Suspense Fiction Facebook group. 

Thanks for asking me, Jon. I love talking about books and writing.

Let’s start off with, where do you live?

I live in Spokane, Washington, the same city where I was born. I’ve lived other places a few times, never more than for a couple of years. Spokane is my home. It’s the only state, by the way, where same-sex marriage and recreational pot are both legal. I don’t smoke, but I’d sure like to be able to do it legally if I want to!

As you probably know, writers rarely like to toot their own horns…lol, but what would you say is your greatest accomplishment? 

Yeah, isn’t that the truth? Tooting someone else’s horn is so much easier! Er, that didn’t quite come out right. Anyway, my greatest accomplishment changes with every book I write, because each book becomes my greatest accomplishment to that point. I like to try new challenges with every book I write, so when I accomplish what I set out to do in that book, I’m thrilled with myself.

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For example, Hearts, Dead and Alive was my first mystery. I’d previously written time-travel novels, which don’t require a lot of structure. I could roam wherever I wanted to with those. With a mystery, you have to make all the pieces fit together, so it was a new challenge for me. It was also written in first person, which was a first for me. I wanted to try to show the readers some truths about my main character that she herself wasn’t aware of. In Murder and the Hurdy Gurdy Girl I went back to third person, but I combined historical fiction with mystery, which was a different sort of challenge.

My most recent accomplishment was completing the third book in my time-travel series, Return of an Impetuous Pilot, which comes out in March. Amelia Earhart plays a pretty big part in the book, so my challenge was to remain true to the real Amelia Earhart in a fictional situation.

I’ve accomplished some things outside of writing, too. I went to law school when I was in my forties, which I’m pretty proud of. My goal at that time was to argue a case at the Washington State Supreme Court. I managed to do that twice before I switched jobs, and I’m proud of that too.

Without getting too personal, would you share a little about your home life?

You bet. I’m married and we live an ordinary house in an ordinary neighborhood with two dogs and two cats. I work during the week as an administrative law judge, and I write on the weekends.

Tonie, my wife, is a retired postal worker and a singer-songwriter, but she recently tried her hand at fiction writing too. Her lesbian novel, Struck! A Titanic Love Story, will be coming out next year from my, now our, publisher Regal Crest Enterprises. I’m super proud of her taking on the project, finishing it, and getting it accepted for publication.

It’s fun being writing wives. We take Jacuzzi baths together and talk about our books and understand each other’s frustrations and excitements about imaginary people and worlds. We’re forgiving when writing takes over and housework and yard work take a back seat. I have a quote by Carmen Bird on the bulletin board behind my computer screen: “You have the choice of a clean house or a finished story. The choice is yours.” We pick the finished story. We need a housekeeper.

Do you fly by the seat of your pants when writing or plot out your storylines in detail?

Neither one, really. I don’t work with a detailed outline, but I do generally know where I’m going, and I always have a few key scenes that I know have to fit in somewhere. Of course, like I said, with time-travel you can pretty much wander around wherever you like, but with a mystery you need more structure.  That doesn’t mean I always know who-dunnit. I start out thinking that I know who dunnit, but in the end I may switch it up. In Hearts, Dead and Alive, I didn’t know who for sure who did it until I reached the end.

Have had you ever had to deal with homophobia after your lesbian novels are released, and if so, what forms has it taken?

I haven’t, really, or if I have it’s been covert enough that I wasn’t really aware of it. I think I lost a few Facebook friends, mostly relatives, because of it. They didn’t say anything, they just quietly disappeared. I write under my own name, so it’s no secret at work or in the community that I write lesbian fiction.

Kate Can you share what inspires and challenges you most in your writing? 

Oh yeah. Like I said earlier, I like to give myself new challenges with each book I write. I like an intellectual challenge. My next challenge is to write a mystery using the omniscient point of view. My other books have been first person or third person limited, alternating points of view by characters or scenes.

As for what inspires me? It’s romance. All my books are character driven and all have a strong thread of romance in them. Those scenes that I imagine before I even start the book are all romantic scenes. The mystery, the time-travel adventure, the historical event, are all crafted to create the situation I want for the relationship. I love nothing more than reading a book with a romantic scene that makes my insides twist, and I’m inspired when I write to try to create those scenes for others.

You have a couple lesbian mystery/thriller fiction novels out currently; Hearts, Dead and Alive and Murder and the Hurdy Gurdy Girl. Have you written or plan to write others with mystery, suspense/thriller themes?  

Yes, I’m working on a “country house” mystery something in the style of Agatha Christie, except the characters are lesbians, of course. That’s the book where I’m attempting the omniscient point of view. It’s my most challenging project so far, and I’m loving it, but I’ve had to take breaks from it to work on other projects, such as a Christmas romance novella that is expected to be released next fall.

You recently released a novel that appears to be historical romance, suspense novel set in Idaho in 1897; Murder and the Hurdy Gurdy Girl. Can you share with us what a “hurdy gurdy girl” is and how did you go about researching the time period?   

Sure. A hurdy gurdy is a musical instrument that was used a lot in dance halls in remote mining towns out west. It was too difficult to bring pianos to some of those places because of the rough terrain, so people brought in hurdy gurdies. You’ve seen small versions of hurdy gurdies on TV where the man has a monkey who turns the handle on a music box. Most hurdy gurdies are between the size of a guitar and a cello, and you could play them on a table or sometimes on your lap. They make a sound sort of like bagpipes. Hurdy gurdy girls were the girls who danced in dance halls that used hurdy gurdies.

I love doing historical research, especially when it’s local. I like to go to the place I’m writing about and imagine it a hundred or fifty or whatever years ago. Murder and the Hurdy Gurdy Girl takes place in Needles Eye, Idaho, which is loosely based on the town of Burke, Idaho. Burke has a colorful past, but it’s a ghost town now. Visiting it was fun.

As for researching the time period, I read read read. I have a Sears Roebuck catalog from 1902 that gave me a lot of ideas about the minutiae of daily life at the turn of the century, and of course I use the Internet constantly. I hate finding anachronisms in historical fiction. When I think I spot one, I’ll google it. Sometimes the answer pops up immediately, and I know the author could have found the answer as easily as I did. That’s just laziness, and it pisses me off.

MurderandtheHurleyWhich living actor would you cast to play your protagonist, Susan Bantry, from Murder and the Hurdy Gurdy Girl?

Oh, I’m so bad at this! I hardly ever watch movies, and my TV watching is mostly of reality shows. To tell the truth, the inspiration for Susan came from an ad in a 1908 Collier’s Magazine that I found in an antique store in Spokane. It’s a pen and ink drawing of a beautiful woman with a deep and mysterious expression on her face. I looked at that face and wondered what her story was. And then I wrote it up.

That said, my wife thinks Sandra Bullock would make a good Susan. Sandra is beautiful enough, for sure, but Susan is a lot more reserved and secretive than any character I’ve ever seen Sandra play.

Last question; can you share with us a little about your current release and/or WIP?

Sure, I’d love to. My latest book, Murder and the Hurdy Gurdy Girl, was released in September 2013 from Regal Crest Enterprises, which publishes all my books. The story takes place in 1897. Susan Bantry is running from the law and hides herself as a dancing girl in a dance hall in an Idaho mining town. The Pinkerton Detective agency is hired to track her down, and cross-dressing Pinkerton Agent Jo Erin O’Leary volunteers for the job. Jo Erin knew Susan when they were kids and has an ulterior purpose in finding Susan, but a mining war breaks out in the Idaho mountains and disrupts her plans. There’s action, adventure, mystery, romance, and a bit of sex in the book.

My next release, coming this March, is Return of an Impetuous Pilot, the third book in the time-travel series. Jill’s experimenting with her time-travel machine when, just like always, things go wrong. Amelia Earhart shows up in 1989 and likes it so much she doesn’t want to go back to 1933. Bennie and Van join forces to try to get Amelia to return to her proper place in history, and of course romantic sparks fly between the two of them again. Will they get things sorted out this time?

Finally, my WIP is something new for me, pure romance. There is no time travel, no murders, no dead bodies, or historical events. It’s just love. Christmas Candy Crush is a novella and is expected out next fall in time for Christmas reading.

On behalf of the Facebook Gay Mystery-Thriller-Suspense Fiction Group, thank you for giving us a little of your time today, answering questions fans of the genre want to know.

Thank you very much inviting me. This was fun!

 

Find Kate McLachlan on the web:

www.katemclachlan.com

 

Interviewing the Gregarious and Terminally Sweet Emerging Author; Jacob Z. Flores

Jacob, Thank you so much for taking time to answer some questions for the members of Gay Mystery-Thriller-Suspense Fiction Facebook group; 

Thank you for having me! I was extremely humbled that you wanted to interview me for your Facebook group. But you should know, I’m a bit shy, so I’ll try not to make too big of a fool of myself. Luckily, I brought along some tequila and a masseur to help with the nerves. I can’t think of anything better than alcohol and a hot man to alleviate the stress. Can you?

Jacob Z. FloresLet’s start off, where do you live?

I live in Victoria, Texas. It’s a small, conservative town so not much really happens here. To really have fun and let it all hang out, you have to drive two hours to San Antonio, Houston, or Austin. And, yes, I do make that drive on occasion. We all deserve to cut loose every once in awhile, right?

As you probably know, writers rarely like to toot their own horns…lol, but what would you say is your greatest accomplishment? 

If I could toot my own horn, I’d never leave the house. Wait a minute. I have a feeling that wasn’t what you were referring to. See, there I go again. Open mouth, insert, um, foot.

Now what were you asking me again? Oh, right. I remember.

My greatest accomplishment in my life is my daughter. She is what I take the most pride in, and she is the cornerstone of my happiness. Because of her, I’ve grown into a much better man. For me, there truly is no greater joy in my life, and I gauge my success by her happiness, health, and outlook on life. There’s no better accomplishment than seeing your child grow and thrive.

In terms of being an author, I have to say my greatest accomplishment is having published 6 books since coming on the gay fiction scene in October 2012. It had been a longtime goal of mine to become a published author, but it was something I put off for one excuse or another: I wasn’t good enough, I didn’t have the time, or I was afraid of failure. But I’ve learned not to compare myself to others. I can only compare myself to myself and use that as a measure of success. And if I want something bad enough, I can’t let a busy life or fear of failing stop me. I have to seize the day and make it what I want it to be.

Without getting too personal, would you share a little about your home life?

Wow. This is a tough one. I just ended a ten-year relationship. It’s been a difficult few months, but as they say, “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.” That’s my new mantra. I’ll grow from this experience and become a better person because of what I’ve been through. I cherish the memories I built, but I have to look forward to the future. Looking back keeps you from moving on.

GiftedOne[The]LGCan you share what inspires and challenges you most in your writing? 

Inspiration comes in various forms. I never know when my muse is going to pick up the bat and whack me upside the head. He just does! I’ve been inspired by a song or a particularly moving image. I’ve even been inspired by a dream. In fact, a nightmare I had a few years ago was the entire reason I wrote The Gifted One. In my dream, I was confined in a dark room with only a lone door in front of me. Something was on the other side trying to get in while I was trying to keep the door shut. The door turned to paper and then caught on fire. I had no choice but to back away, and when the door was gone I knew whatever was on the other side was going to get me. Luckily, this blinding light appeared and when I turned around to see who brought the light, I woke up. The next morning I asked myself: where was I? What was on the other side of the door and who came to rescue me? My answers to the questions turned into The Gifted One.

You have just a couple novels using mystery, thriller, or suspense elements. Do you plan to tackle the genres again anytime soon? 

I do. I have several ideas bouncing around in my head. I can’t go into too much detail right now because they are just sketches of ideas but one involves a gay serial killer and another involves magical brothers facing a whole horde of problems and evil.

Do you fly by the seat of your pants when writing or plot out your storylines in detail?

Oddly enough that has changed for me. I used to be a plotter. When I wrote my first three novels—Moral Authority, 3, and The Gifted One, I plotted the majority of the books out beforehand. However, my latest books have been more off the cuff. I’ve let the characters speak to me and do what they wanted. It’s been interesting for me. For someone who’s as anal retentive as me, letting go of the reigns is difficult but surprisingly enough there’s been a certain about of liberty in abandoning control of my creative side to my muse.

The Gifted One was released in 2013, which is a gay paranormal romantic thriller with mysterious elements. As with this novel and others you have written, you have included paranormal and supernatural elements with some of the characters. What are your influences in creating such characters? 

They are mostly based on what I’ve read over the years. When I was fleshing out the characters for The Gifted One, I knew exactly who I wanted to be the angel Matt fell in love with. It was the Archangel Gabriel. I chose him because he is the bad boy of the angels. As the Angel of Vengeance, he’s grittier and not quite as squeaky clean. After all, Gabriel’s horn is supposed to bring about Judgment Day. I knew some information about Gabriel, but as I researched him more I came upon The Book of Enoch, an apocryphal text of the Bible, and I was fascinated. It details the fall of a group of angels called The Watchers, and it was a story that Gabriel took part in. After reading The Book of Enoch, I had ideas for the entire cast of characters—both the heavenly and the hellish.

Have had you ever had to deal with homophobia after your gay novels are released, and if so, what forms has it taken?

Thankfully, I have not had to deal with any sort of homophobia in relation to my novels or in my life. Even though I live in a rather conservative Texas town, my friends and colleagues have been quite accepting of my work. I’ve been blessed.

Which living actor would you cast to play your protagonist, Mark Bryan, from the Moral Authority? And the charming stranger, Isaac Montoya?

Ooh. Good question. I think I would choose Taylor Lautner to play Mark. I think Taylor would be able to capture the innocent yet rebellious attitude of Mark. Although Mark longs to change the dystopian world in which he lives, his naïveté gets him in trouble more often than not.

For Isaac, I’d choose William Levy. He certainly has the sexy looks and charming attitude to pull off Isaac. Plus William is just so damn adorable; the audience would be taken in by him just as Mark was.

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Congratulations on the re-release of Moral Authority from Wilde City Press, which made The Novel Approach Top Pick 2013 list. Can you share with us a little about the plot with our readers?

I’d love to. Moral Authority actually follows three different characters—Mary Bryan, Isaac Montoya, and Samuel Pleasant. They live in America of 2050, where lifestyle legislation rules the land. The Moral Authority is actually the name of the fourth branch of government that was created to provide citizens with a moral code of conduct.

The Moral Authority was created to combat rampant crime, domestic terrorist threats, and increased national discontent.  It was the hopes of the government to provide a federal agency that would be challenged with creating a moral compass for all to follow. Fostering civil peace amidst national chaos was the goal. If we could be united, then order would be established.

The Moral Authority did achieve that goal, but success always comes with a price.

Morality, a subjective term, is now defined by the government. If an act, lifestyle, or behavior is deemed immoral, it is then considered illegal.

Cursing is outlawed and caloric intake is monitored. Being a homosexual and getting a divorce are criminal offenses. The decisions many made at home now fall under government jurisdiction.

In short, the government runs our lives, and Moral Authority charts the path of a nation that defines and limits civil rights instead of broadening them for all.

On behalf of the Facebook Gay Mystery-Thriller-Suspense Fiction Group, thank you for giving us a little of your time today, answering questions fans of the genre want to know.

Thank YOU for having me. And I want to thank all of your readers who took the time to read this interview. I appreciate you spending your time with me.

 

Find Jacob Z. Flores on the web:

I urge readers to visit me at any or all of my social media sites:

Website/blog: http://jacobzflores.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jacob.flores2,

Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/JacobZFlores,

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5142501.Jacob_Z_Flores

You can buy The Gifted One here:

http://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=3686

You can buy Moral Authority here:

http://www.wildecity.com/books/gay-mainstream/moral-authority/#.UZe6WpUmzzI

 

An Interview with the Gentle and very Humble Gay Mystery and Thriller Writer, Joseph R.G. DeMarco

Author Joseph R. G. DeMarco

by Jon Michaelsen

Joe, thank you so much for taking time to answer some questions for members of the Gay Mystery-Thriller-Suspense Fiction facebook group. 

Let’s start off with, where do you live?

I live in Philadelphia which is a nicer place than most people imagine it to be. It’s a large and lively city with a thriving gayborhood. There’s a lot going on here but there’s always room for improvement. I’ve lived on and off in other places for short periods but Philadelphia is home base.

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As you probably know, writers rarely like to toot their own horns…lol, but what would you say is your greatest accomplishment

I’m not sure I’ve done whatever that “greatest accomplishment” might be yet. I’ve been involved in some pretty wonderful things, though. And I know some incredible people. I think having good people in your life is a great accomplishment.

So, I guess I’m not all that good at tooting my own horn. Maybe if I write a memoir and spill information about some of the juicier moments I’ve had and tell about some of the interesting people I’ve known. There was that time when…

Without getting too personal, would you share a little about your home life?

My home life is pretty simple, really. I live alone and with the exception of a brief flirtation with a family of hamsters, I have no pets. I think the hamsters will make a neat little chapter in the memoir.

I was in a long term relationship, but a number of years ago, my partner passed away as a result of ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease) which is a singularly terrible disease. It was a harrowing time for him. He was a wonderful person, an intellectual and a kind and generous man

I’ve been single since then. Single but looking. I’m open to exploring possibilities. If you’ve got any ideas…

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Can you share what inspires and challenges you most in your writing? 

Things that challenge and things that inspire are two sides of the same coin. I’m motivated and encouraged by good writing in the books I read. The worlds created in those books, the characters, the plots – all of it moves me to do better. I enjoy beautiful writing – and by that, I don’t necessarily mean flowery prose. Good solid prose that draws you in and transports you into another world for a while challenges a writer to work and rework his own material.

You have an incredible mystery/thriller series featuring the incredible hunk, Marco Fontana. How do you sustain serialized, continuing characters that keep readers clamoring for more? 

I guess the easiest answer to that question is to say that the characters live with me and are part of me so they don’t let me forget. What’s more, I like my characters and I enjoy writing about them. I think that’s an obvious requirement for a series – you’ve got to like the world you’ve created and the characters who people it.

Do you fly by the seat of your pants when writing or plot out your storylines in detail?

I do a bit of both. I like outlines and I like going with the flow. That works for me but not for everyone. Each of those approaches has its place in different parts of a project, so you may outline several chapters but as they evolve, they can take you in unexpected directions. I think that some people imagine outlining to be a rigid formula that doesn’t allow changes. And maybe that’s the way it is for some outliners. But it doesn’t have to work that way. It can be lots more flexible.

You recently published your first gay vampire thriller novel, A Warning in Blood. Is this the beginning of another series; what can you tell us about this?

A Warning in Blood from Lethe Press (http://tinyurl.com/kobgtwg) is a vampire thriller – it’s the first of a trilogy which introduces The Vampire Inquisitor Series. Vampires have been an longstanding interest of mine. I even did some academic research about vampire literature and young adult development from which several articles were published. But it took me a while to get a handle on the fictional world.

The following should give you some idea of what it’s about:

Step into the shadows with the first of a series that blends deduction with suspense… and blood. Dru Lorand is not a commonplace vampire – he’s an Inquisitor, chosen by the elders of a most sanguine and secret society. His role is to investigate sedition and punish treason among the undead, of whom there are clans, factions, and territories. He’s made enemies over the centuries. He’s dealt with many of them with the help of myriad assistants, even gargoyles as spies. But now a mysterious party has broken one of the cardinal rules governing vampire society.

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The first signs that something is wrong are small. They go unnoticed in the elegant clubs and refined circles inhabited by the vampire elite. But in the underbelly of the undead world, in those locations only certain humans and vampires can be found, there are those who notice. The danger is real and it is coming.

A terrible threat that could lead to madness unleashed on an unsuspecting world causes Dru to embark on an epic journey. From the posh clubs of Philadelphia to hidden monasteries in the Alps, bloodlines are being drawn and Dru’s fortitude will be tested as he discovers A Warning in Blood.

Have had you ever had to deal with homophobia after your gay novels are released, and if so, what form has it taken?

If there’s been any homophobia connected with the publication of my work, I haven’t experienced it. I think that in general gay and lesbian books are still second class citizens in the literary world, despite the progress we’ve made in other ways. This is partly due to the fact that non-gay people believe that a “gay” novel is substandard in many ways and doesn’t rise to the level of literature. There are a lot of reasons for this but it would take quite a bit of space to spell it all out.

Which living actor would you cast to play your protagonist, Marco Fontana, in your P.I series?

There are so many new actors popping up every day that it’s impossible to say. Most likely I’d either choose minor starlings who haven’t made a splash yet, or I’d opt for some totally new and unknown talent.

One thing is that if and when any of my books are made into movies, it’d be great to be in on the process from script to casting. Is that too much to ask? (Probably.)

Last question; can you share with us a little about your current release and/or WIP?

I forgot to mention one thing when I discussed A Warning in Blood in an earlier question. The back cover has a very interesting picture that caused a stir at the recent reading I did here in Philly. I’ll let that be a surprise for anyone who purchases a print copy.

(UPDATE: Just released, the 4th novel featuring P.I. Marco Fontana, Death on Delancey – out now from Lethe Press)

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On behalf of the Facebook Gay Mystery-Thriller-Suspense Fiction Group, thank you for giving us a little of your time today, answering questions fans of the genre want to know.

Find Joseph R.G. DeMarco on the web: www.josephdemarco.com

 

 

Single Parent Edward Kendrick, on Writing, Influences and His Greatest Accomplishment

Edward, I appreciate you taking time to answer some questions for the members of Gay Mystery-Thriller-Suspense Fiction Facebook group;

Let’s start off with, where do you live?

Denver, Denver County, Colorado, United States of America, Continent of North America, Western Hemisphere, the Earth, the Solar System, the Universe, the Mind of God. (Kudos to anyone who knows the source of this quote – minus the Denver through Colorado part)The_Beast_Within-Edward_Kendrick200x300

As you probably know, writers rarely like to toot their own horns…lol, but what would you say is your greatest accomplishment? 

Raising my son. He’s turned out to be a wonderful, loving young man despite the ‘handicap’ (and I use the term loosely) of being brought up by a single parent.

Without getting too personal, would you share a little about your home life?

I have a home life? LOL Since I live alone I spend most of my time either writing, trying to write, and reading, with a daily foray to go to Starbucks for ‘real’ coffee and then take a long walk if the weather permits.

Can you share what inspires and challenges you most in your writing? 

What inspires me, as corny as it may sound, it trying to write stories that my readers will enjoy. The challenge is to make characters and situations that are believable within the context of a story, be it reality, paranormal or fantasy.

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You have a few gay mystery/thriller series under your belt, such as the Hitman’s Creed and the Winterfield series. How do you sustain serialized, continuing characters that keep readers clamoring for more? 

Oh boy. I’m not sure they’re really clamoring, but… I think it comes down to liking the people I write, no matter what their flaws may be. Then, once they’re created, taking them into another story in the series, even on a peripheral basis, so the readers can see how they’ve moved on and hopefully grown in the process.

Do you fly by the seat of your pants when writing or plot out your storylines in detail?

I definitely write seat of the pants. I may know where I want to go when I start a story—what story I want to tell—but that can change as I go along. I just let the characters do what they want to and with luck it all works out. Of course, when a mystery is involved I have to work on solving it and to that extent I do plot out the story. How it gets to the end depends on what happens as I go along. Even to the point of killing off a main character if I feel it needs to happen, as I did in ‘The Beast Within’.

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You recently released the This Gift, This Curse, a gay romantic mystery. As with this novel and others you have written, you have included paranormal and supernatural elements with some of the characters. What has influenced you to include often challenging characters? 

If there’s no challenge in a—or for a—character why bother writing about them? I do have a soft spot for street kids and the homeless in general. I like to see them overcome the difficulties that brought them to that point to begin with. That said, adding in the necessity to deal with some paranormal aspect of their lives, the way Will had to in ‘This Gift…’ just adds another layer to the character.

Have had you ever had to deal with homophobia after your gay novels are released, and if so, what forms has it taken?

I’ve been very lucky in that respect. I’ve never been called down for writing gay novels. Even my family accepts that I do.

Which living actor would you cast to play your protagonist, Glenn Tanner, from the Hitman’s Creed series (which is my favorite series of yours)?

ActorandTheif

This is difficult because I don’t watch movies or TV on anything close to a regular basis. (I don’t even own a TV – LOL) That said, the first name that came to mind is Jason Stratham. Somehow I can see him being able to handle Glenn’s basic hardness, and his growing awareness that he can be more than he thinks he can be if he allows himself to open up to the possibility of love.y

You recently released The Actor & The Thief, with Wilde City Press, which I am currently reading. As I’ve come to greatly enjoy with several of your novels and novellas, the protagonists are complicated, rough around the edges and not exactly law abiding, instantly capturing the readers’ interest making them want to know more. Can you share with us a little about the plot with our readers?

The plot of ‘The Actor and the Thief’? Basically it’s about two men, a life-long burglar, Craig, who has just been released from prison, and Adam, the man he loved many years ago, who is an actor. Twenty years after they broke up, they run into each other again when Craig returns to Denver to get the money he’s stashed away from his jobs. Someone else wants Craig’s ill-gotten gains and will stop at nothing to get them from him. At first, Adam wants nothing to do with Craig, but eventually he agrees to help him out. Then it comes down to, can the two men stop whoever is after Craig, and in the process will their love be rekindled or will they go their separate ways again.

On behalf of the Facebook Gay Mystery-Thriller-Suspense Fiction Group, thank you for giving us a little of your time today, answering questions fans of the genre want to know.

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Find Edward Kendrick on the web:

http://edwardkendrick.blogspot.com/

https://www.facebook.com/edward.kendrick.5